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Assessment and Treatment of Hyperarousal Behaviors in Dogs: April 2024 Maddie's Monthly Behavior Connection

  • 1.  Assessment and Treatment of Hyperarousal Behaviors in Dogs: April 2024 Maddie's Monthly Behavior Connection

    Posted 04-17-2024 02:52 PM

    Updated 4/26/24 at 11:15am PT:  Recording now available to watch on-demand!

    Does your organization sometimes struggle with excitable or mouthy dogs?  During our 4/25/24 webcast, we learned about Assessing and Treating Hyperarousal Behaviors in Dogs with board-certified veterinary behaviorist, @Dr Jill Sackman.  The webcast description and speaker bio is below:

    Webcast Description:

    Hyperarousal behaviors are common in dogs and are often not correctly identified in the non-clinical behavior setting. Dogs with hyperarousal behaviors can be dangerous, resulting in bruising and bites to family from jumping and grabbing. Injury is often serious enough that many dogs are relinquished. Effective assessment and treatment can result in a majority of dogs being able to stay safely in their adopted home.  This talk will review what is currently known about hyperarousal/ hypersensitivity syndrome in dogs and report on a treatment approach used by the author that has led to significant improvement in behaviors and most of the dogs being able to stay safely in their adopted homes. 

    About Dr. Jill Sackman:

    Dr. Jill Sackman is a Diplomate of both the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and the American College of Veterinary Surgeons. She is a graduate of Michigan State University CVM. She completed her internship at the University of Pennsylvania, her surgery residency at the University of Tennessee, and her behavior residency at Blue Pearl in Michigan. She is the owner and founding veterinarian of Animal Behavior Consultants of Michigan, a referral veterinary behavior practice with offices in metro-Detroit, Grand Rapids, and Traverse City, Michigan. Dr. Sackman is Fear Free certified and sees dogs, cats and horses with behavior disorders that range from mild fears to extreme aggression, compulsive disorders and panic disorders. Dr. Sackman is also a certified professional trainer through the Karen Pryor Academy, earning her KPA-CTP with her French Bulldog, Rose.

    Register for Maddie's Monthly Behavior Connection to view monthly webinars and be sure to join our Maddie's Monthly Behavior Connection group by clicking on the 'Join Community' button on the right side of the group home page so that you receive messages about upcoming webcasts!

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    Sheila Segurson, DVM, DACVB
    Board Certified Veterinary Behaviorist
    Director of Community Solutions
    Maddie's Fund
    Pleasanton CA
    9258608284
    ------------------------------



  • 2.  RE: Assessment and Treatment of Hyperarousal Behaviors in Dogs: April 2024 Maddie's Monthly Behavior Connection

    Posted 04-23-2024 05:38 PM

    Hi everyone,

    Here's a friendly reminder that our webcast about Assessment and Treatment of Hyperarousal Behaviors in Dogs with Dr. Jill  Sackman is this Thursday at noon PT/3 pm ET. 

    See you Thursday!

    Sheila



    ------------------------------
    Sheila Segurson, DVM, DACVB
    Board Certified Veterinary Behaviorist
    Director of Community Solutions
    Maddie's Fund
    Pleasanton CA
    9258608284
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Assessment and Treatment of Hyperarousal Behaviors in Dogs: April 2024 Maddie's Monthly Behavior Connection

    Posted 29 days ago

    Hi everyone,

    Here are Dr. Sackman's responses to unanswered questions from the webcast. 

    @Katie Butler asked: 
    We are wanting to put together new behavior medication protocols. For situations like dogs that are new to the shelter, dogs before and after stressor events like vet visits or fights, etc… Do you know the book 'Veterinary psychiatry of the dog'? Would it be a good place for our vet to start? She is very interested in increasing her knowledge of dog behavioral medication etc. Will definitely share what I have learnt tonight with her :-)

    Reply from Dr. Sackman: Yes, this is a good book. If just starting,  I usually recommend the 5 Minute Veterinary Consult as an Excellent quick reference and as a first book in treating behavior cases. 

    @Megan Alexander asked:
    Do you differentiate in treatment plans between a dog presenting with a genetic link to behavior issues (Mom Dog has the same known issues) verses an developed behaviors due to situational or environmental experiences potentially creating them?
    Reply from Dr. Sackman: I don't generally differentiate treatment plans between genetics and environment in the behaviors I see. All dog behaviors have significant input from both (genetics and environment - both good and bad behaviors).
    Genetics are the template on which the environment interacts with and leads to the behaviors  - Environment often does have significant impact on behaviors  - such as exposure to known triggers - or use of punishment/ aversives that make behaviors worse - so I do address these separately. 

    @Emilia Gordon
    I have seen a few shelter dogs recently who don't seem to have a presentation fully consistent with all of the HSHA syndrome descriptors you mentioned, but they do have what I'd maybe describe as situational hyperarousal- ie in some contexts. They can otherwise relax and focus in other contexts, such as when they are in their kennel, or throughout the day in a foster home including outdoors. The shelter environment seems to make them much worse- ie jumpy/mouthy behaviour. Some of them do seem to also have generalized anxiety, but others do not. I am curious what your recommendations are for these types of dogs.
    Reply from Dr. Sackman: Totally agree that frustration and anxiety are huge in shelter dogs. I like to get these dogs into fosters / homes to reduce the environmental triggers for them. Many of the dogs will also benefit from short term anti-anxiety medication while they are in the shelter. Also- anything that can be done to provide enrichment and manage sounds, provide some simple R+ training as enrichment can be very helpful. 

    Question: 
    Do you have a professional paper that explains the use/dosing of Clonidine to provide to our vets to have the discussion about adding this?  I have dogs already on Fluoxetine already
    Response from Dr. Sackman pending


    Sarah Tarver (Guest)       12:51 PM
    We are an animal rescue organization that pulls at-risk dogs from shelters. A large majority of these dogs have some behavioral challenges, including hyperarousal. What is the recommended initial dose of fluoxetine?
     
    Reply from Dr. Sackman:  Fluoxetine starting dose is 0.5 mg /kg every 24 hrs for 10-14 days, then increase to 1 mg/kg every 24 hrs. 
     
    Question from Margie Garrett DVM, CVA, CVC, CVTP, CCRP... 
    If medicating, how often are you doing blood monitoring with the SSRI with clonidine?  Upregulating the p450 pathway in the liver, I would also be concerned with liver stress. Any other concerns that you have seen?
    Reply from Dr. Sackman: I have a baseline chem panel and CBC and recommend an annual wellness panel after that. Some SSRIs have greater Cyt p450 metabolism than others and if you are concurrently giving drugs that are metabolized through this route you will need to adjust dosing (phenobarb is one). Otherwise - they are a very safe family of drugs. 
    Question from @Thais Ribeiro Teixeira:
    How to differentiate between under socialized dog and hyperarousal?
    Reply from Dr. Sackman: Under/ poorly socialized dogs are almost always fearful, timid, or externally reactive (bark and back away from scary things, or bark and lunge at scary things) 
    @Jessica Calloway asks: 
    Do you believe that starvation in a dog's early development puppy -1 year old collates with severe hyperarousal? I've seen it twice in dogs that were the most severe cases in my 11 years as an animal control officer
     
    Reply from Dr. Sackman: It is possible! I don't think that we have enough data to say for sure - I am pretty convinced that poor early maternal care, or early separation from maternal care plays a role in the development of HSHA.
    Thanks for all the great questions!
     


    ------------------------------
    Sheila Segurson, DVM, DACVB
    Board Certified Veterinary Behaviorist
    Director of Community Solutions
    Maddie's Fund
    Pleasanton CA
    9258608284
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Assessment and Treatment of Hyperarousal Behaviors in Dogs: April 2024 Maddie's Monthly Behavior Connection

    Posted 29 days ago
      |   view attached

    Thanks to the 132 people who attended the webcast yesterday! I have updated this thread with the webcast recording and have attached Dr. Sackman's presentation slides below. 

    Please post any additional questions you have for Dr. Sackman on this thread. Thanks again and hope to see you at next month's webcast (details here)! 



    ------------------------------
    Sheila Segurson, DVM, DACVB
    Board Certified Veterinary Behaviorist
    Director of Community Solutions
    Maddie's Fund
    Pleasanton CA
    9258608284
    ------------------------------